S k i l l
 i n
A R I T H M E T I C

Table of Contents | Home | Introduction

Lesson 3  Section 2

HOW TO NAME OR READ A DECIMAL

Back to Section 1


 6.   How do we name or read a decimal?
 
.038
 
  Ignore the decimal point and read the number as a whole number; then say the decimal unit where the last digit falls.
 

Example 1.

   .038
     "38 thousandths"

Ignore the decimal point and read 038 as the whole number "Thirty-eight."  The last digit, 8, falls in the thousandths place.

When we read .038 as "Point 0, 3, 8," that is "spelling" the number, which is often convenient. But its name is "Thirty-eight thousandths."


Example 2.

   .002135
 
     "2,135 millionths"

Ignore the decimal point, and read  002135  as the whole number 2,135 ("Two thousand one hundred thirty-five"  Lesson 2, Question 4). The last digit 5 is in the millionths place.

Example 3.

   14.0029
 
     "14 and 29 ten-thousandths."

This is called a mixed number.  The decimal point separates the whole number 14 on the left, from the decimal fraction on the right.  In a mixed number, we read the decimal point as "and."

Example 4.    Write these in numerals:

a)  Two hundred four thousand

b)  Two hundred four thousandths

c)  Two hundred and four thousandths

Answers.  

a)  204,000 This is a purely whole number.
b)  .204 This is a purely decimal number.  The thousandths are the 3rd decimal place.  Therefore the 4 must fall in that last place.
c)  200.004 This is a mixed number.  The word "and" will always signify the decimal point.

Example 5.    Write in words:  $607.08

Answer.   Six hundred seven dollars and eight cents.

Save "and" for the decimal point.

Note that cents means hundredths.  (Centum in Latin means 100.)  1 cent is the hundredth part of one dollar.  We write 1 cent either as

$.01  or  1¢.

When we write the cent sign ¢, we do not write a decimal point.

Example 6.   Write "eighty cents" using the dollar sign $ and using the cent sign ¢.

Answer.   $.80  80¢


At this point, please "turn" the page and do some Problems.

or

Continue on to the next Section.

Section 1 of this Lesson


Introduction | Home | Table of Contents


Please make a donation to keep TheMathPage online.
Even $1 will help.


Copyright © 2014 Lawrence Spector

Questions or comments?

E-mail:  themathpage@nyc.rr.com