PERCENT OF A NUMBER

PROBLEMS

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1.  How much is 18.6% of $100?  $18.60

2.  A store paid $100 for a dress. It raised the selling price by 35%.  But
2.  one week later it lowered that price by 10%.  What was the final
2.  selling price?

$121.50.  For, 35% of $100 is $35, so the selling price went to $135. 10% of that is $13.50.  And $135 − $13.50 = $121.50.

3.  The student should know the fractional equivalent of the following.
 1.  a) 50%  =  1
2
  b) 25%  =  1
4
  c) 75%  =  3
4
 1.  d) 12½%  =  1
8
   1.  e)  33 1
3
%  =  1
3
     1.  f)  66 2
3
%  =  2
3
 1.  g)  10%  =   1 
10
  h)  30%  =   3 
10
  i)  70%  =   7 
10
  j)  90%  =   9 
10
 
 1.  k)  20%  =  1
5
  l)  40%  =  2
5
  m)  60%  =  3
5
  n)  80%  =  4
5

4.  Write each of the following as a fraction, or a whole number, or a
3.  mixed number.

  1.  a)  79%  =   79 
100
  b)  3%  =    3  
100
  c)  60%  =  3
5
2.   d)  100% = 1     1.  e)  300% = 3   f) 350%  = 3 1
2
2.   g)  375%  = 3 3
4
  h)  333 1
3
% = 3 1
3
  i)  480%  = 4 4
5

15.  How much is

  a)  75% of $208?  $156   b)  250% of $16?  $40
 
  c)  325% of 200?  $650   d)  75% of $37.60?  $28.20
 
  e)  675% of 400?  $2,700   f)  12.5% of $96.24?  $12.03
 
  g)  30% of $62?  $18.60   h)  40% of $96?  $38.40
 
  i)  40% of $55?  $22.00   j)  20% of $148?  $29.60
 
  k)  20% of $150?  $30.00   l)  70% of $312?  $218.40

16.  Thirds.  How much is

  a)  33 1
3
% of 81?  27   b)  66 2
3
% of 81?  54
 
  c)  33 1
3
% of $32.40?  $10.80   d)  66 2
3
% of $32.40?  $21.60

17.  Calculator problems.  How much is

  a)  33 1
3
% of $706.14?  $235.38   b)  66 2
3
% of $706.14?  $470.76
 
  c)  33 1
3
% of $91.15?  $30.38   d)  66 2
3
% of $91.15?  $60.77

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